Educational Articles

Dogs + Care & Wellness

  • Since we want the best for our pets, we should include them in the go green movement. Here are a few ways you can create a cleaner, greener home for you and your pet.

  • The simple description of an abscess is a “pocket of pus” located somewhere in the body.

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Paracetamol, APAP, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a pain relief and fever-reducing medicine people use for many types of pain.

  • Acetaminophen is a medication that is used to treat fever and/or pain in humans. Acetaminophen is toxic for dogs, and unfortunately, acetaminophen toxicity in dogs is somewhat common as dog owners attempt to treat their dogs for pain without first consulting with a veterinarian.

  • The term “limber tail” is one of several slang terms that apply to a condition that is technically called acute caudal myopathy.

  • Anorexia is a decrease or loss of appetite for food. While hunger is a physically driven, appetite is mentally driven. There are two types of anorexia: true anorexia and “pseudo-anorexia.” Both result in decreased food intake, but a dog with pseudo-anorexia wants to eat (is hungry) but can’t because of difficulty picking up, chewing, or swallowing food or some other cause.

  • Our dogs are part of the family. So, it’s understandable that we reach for human medications when they feel poorly. Before you share the contents of your medicine cabinet with your dog, here are some tips regarding common over-the-counter medications.

  • Azodyl is a nutritional supplement that may decrease azotemia, a condition in which there is too much nitrogen—in the form of urea, creatinine, and other waste products—in the blood. Azotemia occurs in both dogs and cats that have chronic kidney disease (CKD). In theory, Azodyl works by adding nitrogen-consuming bacteria into the intestines. Azodyl should be considered an adjunct (secondary) treatment for CKD.

  • As dogs age, we generally see changes in their behavior. The playful ball-chasing and constant running around that we associate with puppies gives way to adult dogs napping in the sun and lounging during evening TV time. And with senior dogs, we accept even more slowing down.

  • There are numerous products on the market that have been designed to help prevent undesirable behavior in dogs. Leashes, harnesses, and head halters are needed to keep pets under control, especially when outdoors.